The daily miracle so many are trying to extinguish

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The visible destruction of the Catholic Faith

From:

  1. Invalid absolutions; to
  2. Clergy who do not believe anyone goes to Hell, “because God does not punish;” through
  3. Blessing same-sex marriages;
  4. Counseling abortion in cases of danger to the health of the mother; to
  5. Pushing syncretism and idol worship in the name of diversity;
  6. Mocking the confession of mortal sins in kind and number; to
  7. More mockery of the necessary valid matter for the consecration of the Precious Blood of Christ.

It is clear that the institutional destruction of the Catholic Faith by a significant proportion of its clergy is well underway. And the above is just a smattering of what is happening.

The Faith, however, will not die. The Catholic faith and the fullness of its truths will persist in the hearts and minds of those loyal to the Church, even though many will suffer for their personal sins and for the sins of the betrayers. The Faith shall emerge again in all its glory, once the purification and tribulation are over.

Invalid absolutions

Some Catholic priests have taken to ‘granting absolution’ for sins via livestream in these times of lockdown, especially during televised Masses. Such absolutions are invalid and do not result in the remission of sins, no matter how much these priests may use fancy language – such as, e.g., “by the special power granted to me by the Church in these times” – to convince people otherwise.

 

 

Christ is risen

easter

It has begun

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The Mystical Body of Christ is being broken. Like the Bridegroom before her, the Church is now entering into her passion and crucifixion, only to rise even more resplendent than ever before in the coming era of peace and holiness.

It has begun.

Fear is never from God

Father_Damien,_photograph_by_William_Brigham

Fear not them that kill the body and are not able to kill the soul, but rather fear him that can destroy both soul and body in hell. Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? Not one of them shall fall on the ground without your Father. But the very hairs of your head are all numbered (Mt 10:28-30).

A spirit of service or a spirit of fear?

Remember the basic fact that fear is never from God whenever you hear others exponentially increase the fear-mongering in these days of near-chaos, no matter who they may be and what role/status they might hold in either society or the Church, or both.

Prudence is wise; employ it. That is why God gave you reason. But catastrophizing beyond any basis for it is not.

Whenever doubts start to assail you, go back in time and remember one man who not only was unafraid of the other, especially “the diseased other,” but unafraid also of what might happen to him: Saint Damien of Molokai.

Behold I send you as sheep in the midst of wolves. Be therefore wise as serpents and simple as doves. But beware of men. For they will deliver you up in councils and they will scourge you in their synagogues. And you shall be brought before governors and before kings for my sake, for a testimony to them and to the Gentiles: But when they shall deliver you up, take no thought how or what to speak, for it shall be given you in that hour what to speak. For it is not you that speak, but the Spirit of your Father that speaks in you (Mt 10:16-20).

 

Relics of the Passion – 9 – The Stone of the Anointing and the Holy Sepulcher

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From the Stone of the Anointing and the Holy Sepulcher

The Stone of the Anointing

The Stone of the Anointing can be found inside the main entrance to the Basilica of the Holy Sepulcher,[1] Jerusalem. It was placed there after the reconstruction of the church had been finished in 1810 (Murphy-O’Connor, 1998).

According to tradition, the slab of reddish Stone is located in commemoration on the spot where Saint Joseph of Arimathea had prepared the Body of Jesus Christ for burial (See the Holy Land, 2017). It belongs conjointly to the Armenian Orthodox,[2] the Roman Catholics[3] and the Greek Orthodox[4] that are at the Sepulcher, all of whom were indicated as primary custodians of the church in the firman[5] of the Ottoman Sultan, Osman III, in 1863[6] (ibid.; Morio, 2014). Above is a photograph of a relic from the Stone of the Anointing in a sealed hand-carved, gilt-bronze reliquary that comes from the Custodian Franciscans serving the Holy Land.

The Holy Sepulcher

The Holy Sepulcher is the tomb where Christ was buried for three days before His Resurrection. It is located 295 feet (90 meters) northwest of Golgotha.[7] The tomb had been provided for the burial of Christ by Saint Joseph of Arimathea, a member of the Sanhedrin who had quietly disagreed with their condemnation of the Savior.

The tomb, which has a bed of limestone (Romey, 2016; Pells, 2016) upon which the Body of Christ had been placed, is enclosed inside the Kouvouklion, a small chapel that is located in the Aedicule of the Basilica of the Holy Sepulcher. The bed had been covered for centuries by a marble slab with a cross on it, which had been reportedly engraved by the Crusaders. Above is a photograph of a small stone from the Holy Sepulcher in the same sealed bronze reliquary that comes from the Custodian Franciscans in Jerusalem.

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[1] Also known as the Church of the Resurrection.

[2] The Armenian (Saint James Brotherhood; 2011).

[3] The Franciscans of the Order of Friars Minor (Custodia Terrae Sanctae, 2019). Known locally as ‘Latins.’

[4] The Jerusalem Patriarchate (Brotherhood of the All-Holy Sepulcher; 2012).

[5] A firman was a royal decree issued during the time of the Ottoman empire. The 1863 firman confirmed that which had been decreed in the firman of 1749.

[6] The Status Quo (United Nations Conciliation Commission, 1949).

[7] The place of the skull.

Relics of the Passion – 8 – The Shroud

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From the Burial Shroud

The Burial Shroud is a linen cloth of 14 feet 5 inches long by 3 feet 7 inches wide (4.4 x 1.1 meters). Imprinted on it is the negative image of the Body of Jesus Christ (Adler, 2002), which had resulted after the Savior was wrapped in it for His entombment after the Crucifixion.

The Shroud is known to have been in the possession of the Byzantine emperors until the Sack of Constantinople, which occurred in April 1204[1] (Poulle, 2009). Boniface I[2] and his chief counselor, Othon de la Roche,[3] took the Shroud from the Church of Saint Mary of Blachernae together with other relics and kept them in Athens (Anon., n. d.; Legrand, 1982; Piana, 2014; Rinaldi, 1983; Villehardouin, 2007). But after that no mention of it has been reliably documented for another two centuries.

The knight, Geoffroy I de Charny,[4] and his wife, Jeanne de Vergy,[5] were noted as the new owners of the Shroud in the 14th century, where it was preserved from 1360 to 1389 at Monfort-en-Auxois. Their great-granddaughter, Marguerite de Charny,[6] gave the Shroud to Louis I of the Casa di Savoia[7] in 1453 (Chevalier, 1900; Dubarle, 1993), in exchange for the castle of Varambon and monetary assets. The Savoyards in turn presented it to the Holy See in 1983.

The Shroud is woven in a 3-to-1 herringbone twill pattern made of flax fibrils. The negative image imprinted on it has been described as that of

A front and back view of a naked man with his hands folded across his groin. The two views are aligned along the midplane of the body and point in opposite directions. The front and back views of the head nearly meet at the middle of the cloth (ibid.).

The burial cloth of Christ can be found enclosed in a bullet-proof glass case at the Cappella della Sacra Sindone in Turin, Italy. This chapel had been built in the 17th century by Carlo Emmanuele II[8] to house the sacred relic.

Above is a photograph of a single thread from the Shroud in a sealed reliquary that comes from the Augustinians. A limited number of relics of the Shroud had been distributed to Catholic bishops around the world after a drop of molten silver from a fire had damaged a small part of it in 1532, while at the Sainte Chapelle in Chambéry,[9] France (Cruz, 1984).

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[1] The culmination of the Fourth Crusade, which is considered a major victory and turning point in medieval history.

[2] Marchese di Monferrato and King of Thessaloniki. Boniface was one of the knight-commanders of the Fourth Crusade.

[3] Baron of Ray-sur-Saõne and the first Frankish Lord of Athens.

[4] Lord of Lirey and Savoisy.

[5] A fifth-generation descendant of Othon de la Roche.

[6] de Charny became Madame de la Roche in 1418 after having married Humbert of Villersexel, Count de la Roche.

[7] The House of Savoy, a royal family that was established in 1003 at the historical region of the northwest Alps northwest of Italy. The Savoyards ruled Italy from 1861 to 1946 (Ginsborg, 2003).

[8] The Duke of Savoy.

[9] Chambéry was the capital of the Savoy region at the time. After the fire, Emmanuele Filiberto, the current Duke of Savoy, ordered that the Shroud be translated to Turin where it has remained since 1578. The coffer in which it traveled can also be seen (Piana, 2014).